How Culture Plays a Major Role When Marketing to Parents

 

In 1983, companies spent $100 million marketing to kids. Today, they’re spending nearly $17 billion annually. Kids not only have more spending power than ever before, but also have a huge influence on their parents’ purchase behavior. Brands know that successfully reaching kids and parents is no easy task. Winning over the parents, who usually have a final say in the product purchase, is just the first step.

 

In 1983, companies spent $100 million marketing to kids. Today, they’re spending nearly $17 billion annually. Kids not only have more spending power than ever before, but also have a huge influence on their parents’ purchase behavior. Brands know that successfully reaching kids and parents is no easy task. Winning over the parents, who usually have a final say in the product purchase, is just the first step.

While there are many things to consider when marketing to parents, one aspect that is often overlooked is how to integrate different types of parenting styles to make your marketing message more effective. In a diverse society such as ours, culture plays a major role on parenting style. Every culture wants their kids to be healthy, happy and successful, but the road to get them there varies immensely from one family to the other. Our society is more diverse than ever before, and understanding these cultural nuances can definitely improve your marketing effectiveness. Here are some examples on parenting styles from different demographic segments:

  • Millennial parents: As opposed to Gen X and Baby Boomers, Millennials are digitally native, ethnically diverse, late-marrying, and less bound by traditional gender roles. Their households are mini-democracies where everyone can pitch in on even the smallest decisions. They teach their kids to be themselves and to try new things, which they immediately share on social media. Always being connected also has its pitfalls. Some feel the peer-pressure of looking at other kids (and parents) achievements and comparing them to theirs. They also suffer from information overload on parenting issues, and the whole world weighing in on different aspects of parenting, health, etc.

 

 

  • Hispanic parents: The way children behave in public is a reflection of their parenting skills, so respect is one of the most important values that Hispanic parents instill in their children. Education and nurturing may be considered different roles, so parents act as nurturers and may leave the educational aspects solely to the teachers. Hispanic families have a collective orientation, meaning that they rely heavily on extended family and friends. Likewise, traditional gender roles may still play an important part among some Hispanic families.

 

 

  • White Non-Hispanic parents: They place high value on independence, self-expression, and self-sufficiency. Inculcating a sense of autonomy so that kids can make their own decisions later on in life is of extreme importance.

 

Of course, no parenting style exists in a vacuum; there are generational differences in all the groups above and all have cultural nuances. However, brands that understand today’s richness and diversity of cultures and use cultural insights to craft and tailor their marketing message will always have an advantage over those who rely solely on a generic message. To learn more about marketing to parents, follow Dieste Inc. and be sure to subscribe to Provoke Weekly for the latest trends in multicultural marketing.

dieste
jorgelo@thehangar.cr